Leading Through Change In Your Douglas County Small Business

Goodness gracious, has there ever been change this year. I’m mostly referring to all of the new regulations in the tax code: the fact that strategies that “used to work” to reduce our clients’ tax burdens might not work in the same way as they did in the past.

Politics change, cultures change, and what is happening in YOUR Douglas County business is probably undergoing change — AI technology alone is bringing rapid shifts to many businesses, some for the better, some for the worse.

And because of this rapidly-shifting tech, legal, tax and regulatory environment, we tax accountants need to be looking at every procedure through the lens of whether it still makes sense under new laws, etc.

And we do this regularly around here at Bruce L. Fosdick, CPA, PC.

Maybe too much, at times?

I often forget that I, as the owner of my business, have so many different plans and ideas swirling through my head (and interrupting my showers!), that I have to really work at bringing my team on board with my new ideas. And the new rules we have to follow.

Because if I don’t bring my people along, leading through change in our company, well … my ideas go nowhere.

Maybe your team is feeling a similar wind?

Leading Through Change In Your Douglas County Small Business

“You can use the fanciest computers to gather the numbers, but in the end you have to set a timetable and act.” – Lee Iacocca

I’ve had to manage my fair share of employees — both grumpy and delightful. This economy requires change, but I’ve found that employees sometimes resist anything new — not because they’re stubborn or old-fashioned, but for these basic reasons:

They don’t see the need.

You’ve got to explain why the change is necessary — how it will help your company, your customers, and the employees themselves. Otherwise they may think you’re just randomly messing with them.

They’re afraid of the unknown.

Employees may not understand exactly what they’ll have to do differently, or how the change will affect their daily lives. Or they may worry that they don’t have the skills needed to adapt. Tell them what’s changing, and give them the training and support required.

You didn’t actually seek their input.

Employees need a sense of control over their work and their careers. You’ll get a better response by including them in planning from the beginning. Employees who know how your Douglas County organization functions at the ground level will be able to help you target the right areas for change, and be more comfortable with the result.

They’re exhausted.

Downsizings, reorganizations, new products, and revamped org charts can take their toll. Employees may feel they don’t have it in them to go through another major overhaul. Take their feelings into account when announcing any new direction so they know you understand what they’re going through.

So if your organization has been forced to make some changes, work through these issues, right away.

That way your crazy ideas from the shower may actually take shape.

And remember — we’re in your corner. If you need somebody to be “the bad guy”, on whom you can blame whatever you want, we can be your bad guy. But we’d love to help you and your team make the changes you NEED to make, the right way.

It’s just one of the many ways that we like to help our clients. And we’re only a phone call ((303) 688-2751) or an email away.

Feel very free to forward this article to a Douglas County business associate or client you know who could benefit from our assistance — or simply send them our way? While these particular articles usually relate to business strategy, as you know, we specialize in tax preparation and planning for families and business owners.

Warmly,

 

Bruce Fosdick

(303) 688-2751

Bruce L. Fosdick, CPA, PC

Bruce FosdickLeading Through Change In Your Douglas County Small Business